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Did you fall in love in a Greek cinema of the 50s and 60s?

ABC's Radio National is preparing a feature on the history of Greek cinema in Australia

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02 February 2018

ABC's Radio National has a new radio documentary series called The History Listen. They are preparing a feature on the history of Greek cinema in Australia, mainly the period of the 50s, 60s, and 70s.

Peter Yiannoudes, John Tatoulis, and esteemed media academic Deb Verhoeven will be sharing their knowledge on the subject, while the documentary will also include interviews with contemporary Greek Australian filmmakers who were influenced by that era.

As cinemas were a huge part of social life in the 50s and 60s, particularly in Melbourne, and many people met and fell in love within them, the producers are reaching out to the wider Greek Australian community to include this perspective. The interviews will be in English.

If you or someone you know met their love at the movies contact ABC's Earshot producer Miyuki Jokiranta on (03) 8646 1654, 0448 727 388 or email jokiranta.miyuki@abc.net.au

The History Listen is broadcast weekly on Tuesdays at 11.00 am, and repeated on Sundays at 1.30 pm.

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n the 1950's, 1960's and 1970's most Greeks did not even bother to speak to any Anglos unless they had to as it was plain they were not welcome here by the majority of the population; it was something the Australian Government did to undermine the push for Democracy and equal rights by Anglo Australian working class. Divide and rule. Australian Governments still look after British interests before they even think about the millions of Australian people living in poverty. Most Greeks soon knew that to escape from Australia the only way would be to win the Lottery. The Greek Cinema opened up a World where a Greek was not just factory fodder that could be discarded or even killed by toxic work situations without consequence. In the Greek cinema Greeks were human. It was sad to see eighteen year old girls become like old women in a few years of working on a production line, on half wages and try to save a few shillings where they could. Often the only thing missing from being a slave was the whip. How do I talk about shameful things done to women, that child factory workers should not have to witness; especially to women you called "aunty" because they were five years older. Whitlam was loved by Greeks as he recognised their existence. Jeff Kennett is still cheered louder than any other public person by Greeks. Greek "communists" voted for Kennett especially the ones who found the Unions working against them because they were Greek. May we live to see the day when an Australian Government and the Union movement says to sorry to the Greek community for the crimes they committed against them.

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